Bob Troughton

Bob Troughton

Personal information

Date of birth
(1904-06-17)17 June 1904

Date of death
17 August 1988(1988-08-17) (aged 84)

Original team(s)
North Broken Hill[1]

Height / weight
175 cm / 71 kg

Playing career1

Years
Club
Games (Goals)

1926–1929
1930–1935
West Torrens
Geelong
51 (143)
92 (100)

1 Playing statistics correct to the end of 1935.

Robert ‘Bob’ Troughton (17 June 1904 – 17 August 1988) was an Australian rules footballer who played with Geelong in the Victorian Football League (VFL) during the early 1930s.
Troughton played as both a wingman and rover, also at times used up forward. He started his career at South Australian National Football League (SANFL) club West Torrens and topped their goalkicking in 1928 and 1929. Geelong recruited him for the 1930 season and he played in their losing Grand Final that year and their premiership the following season.
References[edit]

^ “North Broken Hill Football Club”. Australian Football. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 

External links[edit]

Bob Troughton’s statistics from AFL Tables
Bob Troughton’s profile from AustralianFootball.com

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Geelong Football Club 1931 VFL premiers

Geelong 9.14 (68) defeated Richmond 7.6 (48), at the Melbourne Cricket Ground

2. Baker (c)
3. Metherell
5. Evans
6. McDonald
7. Lamb
10. Collins
11. Troughton
12. Carney
13. Coghlan
14. Moloney
15. Walker
16. Quinn
17. Mockridge
18. Hickey
19. Todd
20. Greeves
24. Williams
25. L. Hardiman
27. P. Hardiman

Coach: Clymo

This Australian rules football biography of a person born in the 1900s is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Ecgwynn

Ecgwynn

Queen consort of England

Spouse
Edward, King of England

Issue
Æthelstan, King of England
Edith of Polesworth (possibly)

Ecgwynn or Ecgwynna (fl. 890s), was the first consort of Edward the Elder, later King of the English (r. 899–924), by whom she bore the future King Æthelstan (r. 924–939), and a daughter who married Sihtric Cáech, Norse king of Dublin, Ireland and Northumbria. Extremely little is known about her background and life. Not even her name is given in any sources until after the Norman Conquest. The first to record it is William of Malmesbury, who presents it in Latinised guise as Egwinna and who is in fact the principal source for her existence.[1]

Contents

1 Married life
2 An anonymous daughter
3 Family background

3.1 Succession
3.2 Noble consort or lowly concubine

4 Notes
5 References

5.1 Primary sources
5.2 Secondary sources

6 Further reading

Married life[edit]
Ecgwynn’s marriage to Edward the Elder appears to have been consummated before his accession to the throne (899). If Æthelstan was aged thirty when he was elected king (924), as William of Malmesbury claims he was,[2] the year of his birth would have been 893 or 894.[3] By this time, Edward had reached majority and one of his priorities would have been to secure the continuation of Alfred’s line.[4] No sources report what became of Ecgwynn afterwards, though two events are directly relevant. First, William writes that on King Alfred’s instigation, Æthelstan was sent to be raised at the Mercian court of his aunt Æthelflæd.[5] Second, it is known that by 901, Edward had taken to wife Ælfflæd, a daughter of ealdorman Æthelhelm.[6] The reason for this decision is unclear. It may simply have been that Ecgwynn was no longer alive in 899 and that it was therefore only natural that Edward looked for a fresh bride.[3] It is also possible that Edward’s first marriage was thought to lack the political import that was needed to buttress his position as king of the English.[7] Alfred may have been responsible for arranging the first marriage and so his death in 899 would have afforded Edward and his counsellors room to follow a different course.[8]
An anonymous daughter[edit]
The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that King Æthelstan married his sister to Sihtric Cáech (died 927), king of Northumbria, and that the nuptials were celebrated at the Mercian royal centre at Tamworth on 30 January 926.[9] William notes that she was Ecgwynn’s daughter, but was

Mirowice

Mirowice may refer to the following places:

Mirowice, Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship (north-central Poland)
Mirowice, Masovian Voivodeship (east-central Poland)
Mirowice, Pomeranian Voivodeship (north Poland)

This disambiguation page lists articles about distinct geographical locations with the same name.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

Greenbrier State Forest

Greenbrier State Forest

West Virginia State Forest

Howard Creek gap in Greenbrier Mountain

Country
United States

State
West Virginia

County
Greenbrier

Elevation
3,169 ft (965.9 m)

Coordinates
37°44′22″N 80°20′00″W / 37.73944°N 80.33333°W / 37.73944; -80.33333Coordinates: 37°44′22″N 80°20′00″W / 37.73944°N 80.33333°W / 37.73944; -80.33333

Area
5,133 acres (2,077.3 ha) [1]

Established
1938 [1]

Management
West Virginia Division of Natural Resources and West Virginia Division of Forestry

Owner
West Virginia Division of Forestry

Nearest city
White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia

Location of Greenbrier State Forest in West Virginia

Website: Greenbrier State Forest

Greenbrier State Forest is a 5,133-acre (21 km2)[1] state forest between Lewisburg and White Sulphur Springs in Greenbrier County, West Virginia, United States. Greenbrier State Forest is located on Harts Run, a tributary of Howard Creek, and contains historic Kate’s Mountain (3,330 feet/1,015 m).
Greenbrier State Forest features 13 miles (21 km) of hiking trails, many of which are also suitable for mountain biking. There is a heated pool, numerous picnic sites with two shelters, archery range, muzzleloading rifle range, horseshoes, 18 basket disc golf course, and volleyball. A naturalist provides nature and recreational events during the summer months.
Hunting and fishing are permitted; state licenses are required.
Accommodations include 12 one- and two-bedroom cabins, 1 handicapped accessible cabin, and 16 campsites with electric hookups and water available at the central bathhouse.
References[edit]

^ a b c “Greenbrier State Forest”. West Virginia Division of Forestry. Retrieved 2008-10-10. 

External links[edit]

Greenbrier State Forest official website

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Protected areas of West Virginia

Federal

National Historical Parks

Chesapeake and Ohio Canal
Harpers Ferry

National Forests

George Washington and Jefferson
Monongahela

National Recreation Areas

Gauley River (NPS)
Spruce Knob-Seneca Rocks (USFS)

National Wildlife Refuges

Canaan Valley
Ohio River Islands

National Trails System

Appalachian National Scenic Trail

Wilderness Areas

Big Draft Wilderness
Cranberry Wilderness
Dolly Sods Wilderness
Laurel Fork North Wilderness
Laurel Fork South Wilderness
Mountain Lake Wilderness
Ott

Dalian Jinzhouwan International Airport

Not to be confused with Jinzhou Bay Airport.

Dalian Jinzhouwan International Airport
大连金州湾国际机场
Dàlián Jīnzhōuwān Guójì Jīchǎng

IATA: none
ICAO: none

Summary

Airport type
Public

Serves
Dalian, Liaoning, China

Coordinates
39°06′32″N 121°36′56″E / 39.10889°N 121.61556°E / 39.10889; 121.61556Coordinates: 39°06′32″N 121°36′56″E / 39.10889°N 121.61556°E / 39.10889; 121.61556

Map

Dalian Jinzhouwan

Location of airport in Liaoning

Dalian Jinzhouwan International Airport

Simplified Chinese
大连金州湾国际机场

Traditional Chinese
大連金州灣國際機場

Transcriptions

Standard Mandarin

Hanyu Pinyin
Dàlián Jīnzhōuwān Guójì Jīchǎng

Dalian Jinzhouwan International Airport is an airport being built to serve the city of Dalian in Liaoning Province, northeast China. Once open it will replace the existing Dalian Zhoushuizi International Airport as the city’s main airport. It is being built on 21 square kilometres (8.1 sq mi) of reclaimed land off the coast of Dalian. Expected to open in 2018, it is set to become the world’s largest offshore airport.

Contents

1 Background
2 Construction
3 Facilities
4 See also
5 References

Background[edit]
Dalian is currently served by Dalian Zhoushuizi International Airport, which was converted in 1973 from a small military airport of the PLA Air Force. As air traffic skyrocketed, the airport was expanded four times, in 1992, 1993, 2005, and 2011, and served more than 13 million passengers in 2012, ranking 15th in China. Because of the expansion of the city of Dalian, the airport is now surrounded by built-up urban area and has no more room to grow even though it is expected to reach its capacity in 2016. As a result, the authorities launched the new Jinzhouwan Airport project, which was included in the 12th national five-year plan in 2011.[1]
Construction[edit]
The airport project was officially announced in 2012, but construction had already begun in April 2011. It is being built on 21 square kilometres (8.1 sq mi) of reclaimed land[2] in Jinzhou Bay (Jinzhouwan, 金州湾),[1] off the coast of Dalian, and is set to become the world’s largest offshore airport.[2] It is designed to handle the Airbus A380, the largest passenger jet, and is projected to cost 26.3 billion yuan (US$4.3 billion) to build.[2] The airport is expected to open in 2018, and will become Chin

Whiskeytown, California

Whiskeytown

Unincorporated community

Aerial view of the Whiskeytown National Recreation Area.

Country
United States

State
California

County
Shasta County

California Historical Landmark

Reference no.
131[1]

Whiskeytown is an unincorporated community in Shasta County, California, United States. The ZIP Code is 96095. The community is inside area code 530. Although once a bustling mining town, there are very few people living in Whiskeytown as of today. The entire town of Whiskeytown was flooded to make way for Whiskeytown Lake in 1962. The ZIP Code of 96095 is now defunct as it has been taken over by ZIP Code 96033 in nearby French Gulch. The town of Whiskeytown is now properly part of French Gulch as the original post office and store (that were moved to higher ground in 1962) closed after 40 years. But Whiskeytown appears on many maps. All that remains is the relocated store, a few residences, mostly occupied by National Recreation Area personnel, and old mines that are above the water level of the lake. Whiskeytown is registered as a California Historical Landmark.[1]

Contents

1 History
2 Present day

2.1 Politics

3 References

History[edit]
Whiskeytown was one of Shasta County’s first gold mining settlements during the California Gold Rush of 1849, though at the time it was called Whiskey Creek Diggings. There are two different stories for how the settlement got its name: The first states that a barrel of whiskey fell from a pack mule and into the creek that ran by Whiskeytown; the second attributes the name to the legend that miners at Whiskeytown could drink a barrel of the hard liquor a day.[2]
The area became known as a good place to mine for gold. The Redding Record Searchlight reports miners averaged $50 in gold per day, and in 1851 a 56-ounce gold nugget was found. The first white woman arrived in town in 1852, and by 1855, about 1,000 gold miners lived in Whiskeytown. The post office was opened in 1856, but the federal government didn’t allow the Whiskeytown name to be attached to it because it was considered inappropriate. Finally, in 1952, the federal government agreed to name the post office after the town.[2]
Construction of the Whiskeytown Dam began in 1960, and the basin began to fill with water in 1962. Some Whiskeytown buildings were moved to higher ground, but others remain underwater. The dam was dedicated by President John F. Kennedy in 1963.[2]
Present day[edit]
Today, what was once a bustling mi

Pangean megamonsoon

The Pangean megamonsoon refers to the theory that the supercontinent Pangea experienced a distinct seasonal reversal of winds, resulting in extreme transitions between dry and wet periods throughout the year. Pangea was a conglomeration of all the global continental land masses, which lasted from the late Carboniferous through the mid Jurassic.[1] This megamonsoon intensified as the continents continued to shift toward each other, reaching its maximum strength in the Triassic, the period in which continental surface area of Pangea was at its peak.[2][3]
The megamonsoon would have led to immensely arid regions along the interior regions of the continent. These areas would have been nearly uninhabitable, with extremely hot days and frigid nights. However, the coasts experienced seasonality, transitioning from rainy weather in the summer to dry conditions during the winter.[4]

Contents

1 Monsoon circulation

1.1 Discovery of the Megamonsoon
1.2 Monsoon climate on Pangea
1.3 Comparing the East Asian Monsoon and the Pangean Megamonsoon

2 Pangean Megamonsoon in the Geologic Record

2.1 Coal and Evaporites
2.2 Loess
2.3 Paleontological Evidence

3 Evolution of the Megamonsoon

3.1 Carboniferous
3.2 Permian
3.3 Triassic
3.4 Jurassic

4 Future work
5 References

Monsoon circulation[edit]
Monsoon circulations, defined as a seasonal reversal of winds, exhibit large shifts in precipitation patterns across the impacted region. Monsoons are therefore characterized by two primary seasons: rainy and dry. They are induced by the presence of at least one large land mass and large body of water in close proximity to each other. The most commonly studied present-day monsoon circulation is the East Asian Monsoon.
Discovery of the Megamonsoon[edit]
The concept of a Pangean monsoon circulation was first proposed in 1973.[5] The evaporites in the geologic record suggested vast and extensive regions of persistent dry conditions near the Pangean centre, serving as the initial evidence for the theory’s dissemination. The interior of the supercontinent, especially the eastern portion, would have been extremely dry as the hemispheric pressure systems driving the circulation would have diverted nearly all atmospheric moisture away from the region.[6] Later indication of a monsoon-driven climate was acquired via the examination of coal deposits along the exterior portions of the continent. The presence of both of these features in the geologic record suggested monsoonal cir

Seyyed Jamal ol Din

Seyyed Jamal ol Din or Seyyed Jamaleddin (Persian: سيدجمال الدين‎‎) may refer to:

Seyyed Jamal ol Din Rural District, in Hormozgan Province
Seyyed Jamaleddin, Kerman

This disambiguation page lists articles about distinct geographical locations with the same name.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

Shur

Shur may refer to:

Shur (Bible), location in the Hebrew Bible
Shur-e Qarah Kand, a village in East Azerbaijan Province, Iran
Shur-e Tazeh Kand, a village in East Azerbaijan Province, Iran
Shur, Fars, a village in Iran
Shur, Qazvin, a village in Iran
Shur, Iranshahr, a village in Sistan and Baluchestan Province, Iran
Shur, Tehran, a village in Iran
Shur-e Bala, a village in Iran
Shur-e Sofla, a village in Iran
Shur Qazi, a village in Iran
Itaal Shur (b. 1966), American songwriter
Michael Shur (born 1942), Soviet-born professor of solid-state electronics and physics in the United States
USS Shur (SP-782), a United States Navy patrol boat in commission from 1917 to 1919
Taurus (constellation), one of the constellations of the zodiac

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Shur.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

Shakshukuk Island

Shakshukuk Island

Geography

Location
Cumberland Sound

Coordinates
65°16′N 66°52′W / 65.26°N 66.86°W / 65.26; -66.86 (Shakshukuk Island)Coordinates: 65°16′N 66°52′W / 65.26°N 66.86°W / 65.26; -66.86 (Shakshukuk Island)

Archipelago
Canadian Arctic Archipelago

Highest elevation
30 m (100 ft)

Administration

Canada

Territory
Nunavut

Region
Qikiqtaaluk

Demographics

Population
Uninhabited

Shakshukuk Island is a Baffin Island offshore island located in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago in Nunavut’s Qikiqtaaluk Region. It lies in Cumberland Sound, at the mouth of Robert Peel Inlet.[1] Shakshukowshee Island lies along its west side.
References[edit]

^ “Shakshukuk Island, Nunavut, Canada”. travelingluck.com. Retrieved 2008-09-18. 

External links[edit]

Shakshukuk Island in the Atlas of Canada – Toporama; Natural Resources Canada

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Islands of the Qikiqtaaluk Region

 

Adams
Akpatok
Alfred
Allen
Amherst
Arvalik
Aulitivik
Aulitiving
Baffin
Barth
Beloeil
Bergesen
Bjarnason
Bylot
Curry
Davids
Dexterity
Diana
Edgeworth
Eider
Elder
Emmerson
Fraser
Frechette
Gyrfalcon
Hamilton
Imiqqutailaqtuuq
Kaigosuiyat
Kilian
Lady Franklin
Landslip
Liddon
Lock
Low
Marvin
Nakoaiyet
Nova Zembla
Old Squaw
Ormonde
Otrick
Pandora
Payne
Peter Richards
Pisiktarfik
Plover
Prescott
Prince Leopold
Prince of Wales
Ragged
Round
Russell
Salikuit
Saneruarsuk
Scott
Sillem
Somerset
Spicer
Stephens
Trinity
Vesey Hamilton
Vivian
Ward Hunt
Wollaston
Yeoman
Young

Belcher Islands

Bradbury
Broomfield
Bun
Cake
Camsell
Dove
Fair
Flaherty
Innetalling
Karlay
La Duke
Loaf
Mata
Mavor
Moore
Nero
Ney
O’Leary
Range
Renouf
Snape
Split
Tukarak
Twin Cairns
Walton
Wiegand

Islands of Cumberland Sound

Akulagok

Anarnittuq
Aupaluktok
Aupaluktut
Beacon
Blacklead
Clear Passage
Drum
Ekallulik
Iglunga
Imigen
Ivisa
Kaigosuit
Kangigutsak
Kekertelung
Kekerten
Kekertukdjuak
Kudjak
Maktaktujanak
Miliakdjuin
Moodie
Nimigen
Nunatak
Nuvujen
Opingivik
Sanigut
Saunik
Shakshukowshee
Shakshukuk
Tesseralik
Tuapait
Ugpitimik
Utsusivik
Wareham

Islands of Davis Strait

Akuglek
Alikdjuak
Angijak
Durban
Idjuniving
Kekertaluk
Kekertuk
Kekerturnak
Manitung
Monumental
Nedlukseak
Nudlung
Nunatsiaq
Nuvuktik
Padloping
Pilektuak
Qaqaluit
Rock
Satigsun

Islands of Foxe Basin

Air Force
Bird
Bray
Deer
Foley
Igloolik
Jens Munk
Koch
Neerlonakto
North Tweedsmuir
Prince Charles
Rowley
South Tweedsmuir
Tern
Whi